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welcome email

Your welcome email is the very first message you send to your subscribers — so it’s important to make a fantastic first impression.

The reason: If you dazzle your readers with your welcome email, they’ll be more likely to open the next email you send.

But that doesn’t mean you need to spend hours crafting the perfect welcome email. You can do it in less than a minute.

Seriously. We timed it.

You can use AWeber’s Email Libs tool. It comes with 50 templates, and all you need to do is fill in the blanks.

Check out how easy it is to use below.

What to include in your welcome email

This welcome email template in Email Libs includes some key components every welcome email should have.

  1. It welcomes your subscribers to your list.
  2. It sets expectations (reveals the type of content your subscribers can expect from you, as well how often they will receive it).
  3. It delivers your lead magnet a.k.a. your incentive (if you have one) for joining your list.
  4. It includes your contact information.
  5. It asks your subscribers to “whitelist” you so that your messages reach their inbox instead of their spam folders.

If you want to really knock your welcome email out of the park, though, we recommend using it as a starting place. 

Add your own twist

Once you fill in the blanks in the template, copy and paste the words into a Word doc or a Google doc. Then add your own “spice” to the text to personalize it.

Here are some easy ways to do that.

1. Be human. Your welcome email is automated, but it shouldn't sound like it came from a robot. Your subscribers want to hear from you. Set the tone, and let your personality shine through.

If you like using emojis, add one. 😎

If you have opinions, confidently express them.

If you’re always an optimist, end with your favorite motivational quote.

If you pride yourself on being irreverent, then tell it how it is!

Heck, if you’re the king of “dad jokes,” include one. (How do you make a Kleenex dance? Put a little boogie in it!)

Remember, this is your first impression. Make a splash right from the get-go. If you do this right, your readers will eventually be able to recognize your voice in every stage even if your logo and brand colors go missing from your emails. And they'll be even more excited to open your next email.

2. Avoid R.O.T. (redundant, outdated, and/or trivial information). Your content has to be valuable.

A subscriber joined your list because they think you can help them solve their problem. Sure, you may have a free lead magnet to entice them, but that content still needs to be high-quality, fresh, creative, and useful.

If it’s just something your subscribers can find on Google or your emails are full of content that your competitors also provide, they’ll bounce out of your list and never make it to the next email in your series.

3. Tell stories. Humans love stories. We communicate through them. We learn from them. Our personal stories and memories give our lives meaning and order.

Your welcome email can include your story. It’s your chance to tell your subscribers why you’re the best person to give them information.

But don’t write a novel. Try to keep your story to 10 sentences or less.

Here’s a great example of a super short, but compelling Story Email from Jill Angie of Not Your Average Runner. It’s her first email in her automated series for new subscribers, and it’s included as a section within her welcome note.

Story Email

Jill’s story is 10 sentences. That’s it. But in her story she oozes likability and she hits her readers’ biggest pain point: weight loss. She knows that’s why her subscribers joined her mailing list, so she wastes no time addressing their challenge in her very first message.

If you’re not a writer, no problem. Shoot a quick 30-second video of yourself and link out to it from your welcome email. Or include a photo of yourself. 

What comes after your welcome email?

Once you have your welcome email set, it's time to start thinking about the rest of your sequence.

Check out the exact emails you should place into the 5 stages of the marketing funnel.

 

The post How to Write the Perfect Welcome Email in Under One Minute appeared first on Email Marketing Tips.


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Wouldn’t it be nice if emails came with a little “thumbs up” or “thumbs down” button like Facebook posts? You would instantly know if your message resonated with people or not.

At AWeber, we made this a reality. We built a sentiment widget — a clickable question at the bottom of our emails that collects immediate feedback from our subscribers. It looks like this:

This single clickable question has completely changed the way we engage with our subscribers.

In this episode of “Win at Email Design,” I speak with AWeber email designer Kim Robbins about the results of adding the sentiment widget to all our emails. We chat about the importance of gathering feedback and how you can use it to optimize your messages and content.

Watch the video above to hear all about the sentiment widget. What kind of feedback would you like to capture from your subscribers? (Click here if you want to add a sentiment tool to your own messages.)

Feedback is like fuel for your marketing funnel. It can help you to subscribers into buyers and brand advocates. But are you including the right emails throughout your funnel? Discover how to map out your own powerful 5-stage funnel and how to create an automated email campaign that gets results around-the-clock in 24/7 Email Marketing Master Class. (Sign up soon! Class closes on March 13!)

For more AWeber “Win at Email Design” episodes with yours truly, check out my YouTube page. There, you’ll find tips on how to to structure a welcome email and how to design an email using only text.

The post The Simple Question You Should ALWAYS Include in Your Emails appeared first on Email Marketing Tips.


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Last year, my wife Lindsay and I launched a writing experiment together. As busy parents trying to raise two young girls, we wanted a way to capture our thoughts and reflect on life rather than just watch it pass by.

We decided to send 100-word emails three times a week for one year straight.

Why such short emails? Nowadays, people have the attention span of a goldfish. Litmus, an email testing tool site, found that the average time spent reading an email is 11.1 seconds. That’s it!

With Twitter, texting, and skimmable Facebook feeds, people are no longer accustomed to reading long-winded posts. You need to grab people’s attention—fast.

That’s why Lindsay and I promised our readers quick, to-the-point short emails that could be read in one minute or less. We assumed subscribers would regularly open and engage with these shorter emails.

We hosted the email list sign up form at 100-words.com. When people signed up, they received a 100-word welcome email that set the expectations for the series. It looked like this:

100-word email length

(You can find the archive of all the 100-word emails here.)

The very first email went out on January 2, 2017. Here were the outcomes of our little year-long experiment.

1. We are better writers now.

At first, it seemed easy to write 100 words. Then, suddenly, you’re staring at 500 words on the screen. 

That’s when the real work begins.

Lindsay and I had to be tough editors to get exactly 100 words every single time. We had to be concise (which was hard for us—we’re both ramblers!) without stripping away any context.

Over the course of 12 months, this got easier and easier. Now, whenever I write, I carefully choose my words. If I can write a sentence in 10 words instead of 15, I do it. I'm a more succinct communicator since ending this experiment.

(Try it for yourself! Go to wordcounter.net and begin typing a sentence. See how how quickly 100 words can flow from your keyboard to the screen?)  

2. Our open rates were extremely high.

The typical open rate—the measure of subscribers that opened your message—will vary depending on your industry, but 20% to 40% is the average. Our average open rate was 57%.

Our high open rates were due in part to our small list (approximately 80 people because we didn’t do much promotion). As your list size goes up, your open rate typically falls.

But our high open rates was also due to our short-and-to-the-point content. Our subscribers knew exactly what to expect from us. We never wavered. We never sent a 90-word email or a 105-word email. We never tried to sell them anything. We never took advantage of the fact that we were invited into their inboxes.

Every single individual on that list was important to us. At the end of the day, I’d rather have 80 highly engaged subscribers than 1,000 that never open or read our emails.

(Is it time to purge your list of subscribers? Find out here.)

3. We had a low unsubscribe rate.

Because our emails were just 100 words and super conversational, we ended up building relationships with a large portion of people on our list. Many of our readers would email us back and give us their thoughts, suggestions, feedback, and advice. If we missed a post, they would email us to ask why we were slacking. (They kept us motivated!) We only had a handful of people unsubscribe over the course of the year.

I was recently reminded of a video by American author and marketing guru Seth Godin. In it, he says, “permission is the privilege of being looked forward to and being missed if you were gone.”

I think this list of subscribers gave us that level of permission! They invited us into their inbox. They liked our content, opened it, engaged with it, and continued to invite us back week after week for an entire year. When you get to that point with your audience, you know you're doing something right. 

4. The feedback was overwhelmingly positive.

At the bottom of our emails, we always included a hyperlinked question “Did you like this email?” If the reader clicked the link, they were taken to a form to tell us why.

These micro actions allowed for a feedback loop. People clicked through and left their reactions to our musings. They told us they looked forward to the short, snackable content every week, and their comments sometimes spurred new email topic ideas.

Plus, the affirmations helped keep us energized to make it the full 12 months.

If you want to set up something similar on your own emails, you can embed a sentiment widget. It allows you to track feedback on every message and learn what your audience likes and dislikes about your content. It’s a great way to constantly hone your emails and improve your open and click-through rates. Click here to learn how to embed your own sentiment widget.

Should you shorten the length of your emails?

One hundred words is an aggressive constraint, but it really forces you to edit yourself. Turns out, you don't need as many words as you think you do to write well.

Now, I'm not saying you need to commit to a year of 100-word musings. But give it a try every now and then. For instance, if you send a weekly newsletter, keep your intro to 100 words or less. Your readers may appreciate the brevity.

You can also send 100-word emails over a shorter timeframe, like two weeks or one month. Then track open and click-through rates and sentiment widget feedback to see if there's a change in your subscribers' behavior. They may start interacting more with your content than they did when it was longer.

If you're looking for more email writing tips, check out this FREE What to Write course. You'll get 45+ email content templates to help you craft the perfect message every single time.

The post I Sent Only 100-Word Emails for One Year and Here’s What Happened appeared first on Email Marketing Tips.


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You’ve spent long hours — and probably some decent money, too — honing the visual experience of your website. It captures the essence of your brand, while also being easy to navigate and interesting to click through.

So it makes sense that you’d want your email design to match your website. But which elements from your site should make an appearance in your emails, and which should not?

In this fourth episode of “Win at Email Design,” I discuss how these two brand assets can complement each other while also maintaining equally important and different roles.

After watching the video above, let me know your thoughts in the comments below: What website elements do you include in your emails?  

(Oh, and go easy on my outfit choice.  Looking back, the jacket was a poor choice.)

For more AWeber “Win at Email Design” episodes with yours truly, check out my YouTube page. There, you’ll find tips on how to create an awesome welcome email, how to rock a newsletter design, and how to design an email using only text.

And if you’re not sure what to write in your emails? Download these 45+ FREE writing templates. Learn how to craft the perfect message or just fill in the blanks!

The post Should Your Emails Match Your Website Design? appeared first on Email Marketing Tips.


Read full article on: Aweber